Xanax Abuse in Essex CT (860) 207-8342

Xanax abuse is strikingly common, with the National Institute on Drug Abuse identifying Xanax as part of a nationwide epidemic of illicit or excessive prescription drug use and addiction. Although Xanax abuse does not always lead to addiction, it can nevertheless create physically and psychologically dangerous dependency. Here are the key facts you need to know about Xanax abuse and addition.

What is Xanax?

A schedule IV drug, Xanax (sometimes known as Alprazolam) is a central nervous system depressant that is prescribed as a treatment for a range of short or long-term anxiety disorders. In addition, it can be effective at suppressing some of the nausea experienced by patients undergoing chemotherapy for cancer. Abuse of this drug might start after a prescription for a legitimate health problem, or it might begin through recreational use. Some of the drug’s most common street names include xannies, z-bars, totem poles and benzos. Call Drug Treatment Centers Essex at (860) 207-8342 to get the help you need.

Abuse and addiction

Xanax reduces neurological nerve activity, inducing feelings of calmness, relaxation and safety. Many people, especially those who are stressed or anxious, find great relief in this experience.

This drug is habit-forming, partly because it is fairly short-acting. Since it typically causes the strongest effects within the first hour, it’s common to start taking extra doses in order to prolong these effects. In addition, tolerance builds quickly, so you’ll need increasingly greater doses of the medication in order to enjoy the same effects.

Some of the most common signs and symptoms of Xanax drug abuse are drowsiness, reduced energy, and a sense of being detached from reality. These effects are often observable from an external perspective, with the person seeming disengaged and vacant.

Other indications that someone may be engaging in misuse of this medication include the typical signs of drug abuse and addiction, such as behavioral changes, mood swings, secretiveness and a reduced interest in previously enjoyed activities. It’s also worth noting that Xanax is often taken in conjunction with alcohol or prescription painkillers.

Health effects of short and long term abuse

Even in the short term, high doses of Xanax can induce worryingly physical and physiological changes. Some of the most common include reduced libido, dizziness, disturbances in heart rhythm, memory problems, and difficulty focusing.

When abused for longer periods, the drug can cause chronically low blood pressure, repressed reflex reactions, episodic fainting, breathing problems and even comas. Meanwhile, a common mental health side effect is an increase in anxiety, including an urge to self-harm or new suicidal ideation. Due to increasing tolerance, there is also risk of overdosing by accident, which can be fatal.

Withdrawal

Experts recommend that withdrawal from any drug of abuse should take place in the setting of an inpatient treatment facility and not in the home. For one thing, success is dramatically reduced in the home, where withdrawal symptoms can prompt quick relapse. Meanwhile, potentially hazardous or painful withdrawal symptoms can be much more effectively managed in a medical detox setting.

If you’ve become dependent on Xanax, the gold standard for treatment involves stopping its use under close medical supervision. Typically, the dosage will be gradually reduced to prevent fits, paranoid delusions and emotional distress. Once you have been through the detox process, it is recommended that you undergo both individual and group therapy in order to address the reasons you started abusing the drug, and with a view to developing strategies that will help reduce the risk of relapse.

If you’re abusing Xanax and feel like you need treatment, call Drug Treatment Centers Essex today on (860) 207-8342.

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